Attention à l’Écart: Whose gap is it anyway? #SLTChat footprint

April. Paris. Gare Montparnasse. The early morning train from Le Mans pulls into the metropolis. Forty two very excited children plus eight equally excited adults arrange themselves for disembarkation. The doors open and the group flows onto the platform. A yell from the boy immediately behind me. I turn and look down to see the upper half of a disoriented T above the platform, his lower half, not visible, down between the train and the platform. I helped him up. T, being T, brushed himself down, turned to an astonished assortment of onlookers and laughed it off. I gulped, took control of myself, and we headed for our first stop, the Eiffel Tower.

Gare Montparnasse, Paris

I was asked a few weeks ago if I would consider hosting #SLTchat on Twitter. I said yes, I would welcome the opportunity. Last week I was asked if I was available to host on the upcoming Sunday. Of course I would. What a wonderful opportunity to encourage and broaden a debate that receives far too little airtime, in my opinion; Community Engagement. I did not appreciate just how challenging hosting ‘chats’ actually is; trying to track and contribute, in the moment, to a myriad of conversation threads. That aside, it was an exhilarating experience. What I did not anticipate was the footprint that is left behind after these events. A rich source of responses, opinions, thinking and ideas contributed by all participants.

Prior to the event, #SLTChat participants are encouraged to help shape the debate by voting for one of three given options. The 25 character limit for each of these is restrictive but I pitched three distinct areas into the mix. The poll results (263 votes) were as follows:

  1. Hard to reach schools? 20%
  2. Closing gaps together? 47%
  3. More than learning? 33%

I was required to set two questions. I thought long and hard about what they should be. I thought about language (admittedly, UK parlance) and what it was I hoped to achieve and where I hoped the debate would go, whilst leaving it open enough to encourage broader contributions. I settled on the following:

  1. Does a focus on the attainment gap limit what is possible through partnership?
  2. How do we listen to one another for the benefit of our children and young people?

This blog focuses on Q.1. I will blog on Q.2 in due course. I largely avoid directly quoting participants. Rather, I will pick out key themes that illuminate the debate.

The first question…

Every word selected with good reason; four very deliberately used key words and one key phrase: ‘attainment’, ‘gap’, ‘limit’, ‘partnership’, and ‘attainment gap’.

20:00 hrs, Q.1 posted… And they’re off, at a fair old gallop!…

Words used have meaning. Particular words used in this sentence (question) resonated with some more than others, foregrounding responses given. I have attempted to winkle out key themes and ideas, acutely aware that my choice of words might impact on any given reader’s receiving of them. I make no attempt to anonymise, as such. Rather, I paraphrase or use my own words.

  • If partnership is desirable then that should be the focus, over emphasis on the attainment gap detracts from partnership potential.
  • Knowledge of the gap offers a desired comparator for parents to know where their child is placed overall, and so future progress be gauged.
  • Use of such language (gaps), along with such a strong focus, by schools, and then deliberate sensitising of such language in conversation with parents serves to widen the gap between families and school.
  • If we become too fixated with comparisons/attainment/gaps etc then the individual child can get lost. It’s why the challenge of parents is a good thing. It grounds us and reminds us that these are children, not numbers on a spreadsheet.
  • Knowledge for parents is essential so they can advocate for their children and use information to inform decisions such as changing of setting.
  • Transparency around school knowledge sharing with parents empowers and respects parent right to advocacy.
  • Knowledge of any gap is a right for parents and it is wrong to think otherwise.
  • Focusing on ‘gaps’ just promotes more deficit models of development rather than the positives that exist with true partnerships.
  • If the focus for schools is the attainment gap, with parents an afterthought, that needs challenging.
  • Our children and young people are growing up in a world where comparison is made as a matter of course and we need to prepare them for that.
  • Encouraging our children and young people to be aware of and celebrate their uniqueness, what they have to offer, and how they relate to others, should trump how they compare to others.
  • Securing parental engagement and contribution is critical for closing gaps.
  • Working in partnership on progress and potential is just as important as the addressing of any academic attainment gaps.
  • Whole child development must be the partnership focus so that they have the social as well as academic competence to face a challenging world.
  • Working in partnership promotes different thinking on how we go about closing gaps.
  • Schools serve communities so they must factor partnership in when setting priorities such as closing of attainment gaps.
  • Working in partnership  with parents pastorally too – expectations on community behaviour, online presence, attitude to culture etc. – is equally important.
  • Academic and social ‘gaps’ are present prior to a child starting or attending any one school. Schools cannot address these alone and should not be “scapegoated” through accountability measures.
  • Our best resource in securing better learner achievement and attainment, outside the school, is parental and community engagement.

I have absolutely avoided categorising statements in any sort of ‘for’ and ‘against’ way. The conversation is riddled with nuance and, so, exceedingly complex. It is clear that some responses come from a parent perspective, others from a school perspective, some from teacher/parent perspective. Other participants, indeed, flip between the two.

In the interests of a more complete record and a resource for anyone interested I have attempted to capture all tweets tagged #SLTChat, from all participants  here. I have made no attempt to categorise, they are listed in the order they came through. Where tweets are in response to a tweet, the earlier tweet is shown. I apologise now if I have missed any. I may also have duplicated some.

I will not draw any conclusions or attempt to project my own thoughts or experience on what has come from the first part of this Community Engagement debate. I think that would be an abuse of privilege. The privilege being that so many participants gave up their time to engage in this debate, addressing an agenda set by myself, and myself having a special interest in this field. More on my interest and what I offer here.

I welcome challenge on anything missed out or misconstrued. I very much welcome further comment and opinion on what I have pulled out of the rich data generated by Sunday evening’s conversation, courtesy of #SLTChat @SLTChat. If you could post that as a comment on this blog, for all to see and think on, then so much the better. To do so, click on ‘Leave a comment’ at the top of this blog, just below the title. Maybe we can extend the debate still further.

 

Returning to Paris. T was there as a result of him closing his personal gap. He was a long way from meriting a place on that train alongside his peers. Let us just say that challenging behaviour featured. Zero tolerance has never been in my lexicon. I worked with T, his mother, and extended family, over a significant period of time. T did very well in the SATs a few weeks after we returned from France. He made a very successful transition into secondary school.

One evening during the week spent in France, I played T at Pool; fulfilment of a promise made many months before, should T make it. Best out of three. I was the victor, two frames to one. None of that ‘It’s the taking part that matters’, nonsense for me!

Fast forward to the final day of term. T approached me holding out a glittering trophy. He handed it to me and said, quite simply, “Thank you, Mr Feasey.” The trophy was engraved with, ‘I will beat you at Pool one day!’ and his name. Mother stood in the background, smiling. Proud of her boy.

 

Thinking on T, his mother, and our partnership in supporting T with his needs, I will finish with a comment made by Chris Chivers (Twitter: @ChrisChivers2) in response to Q. 1. Does a focus on the attainment gap limit what is possible through partnership?

The focus should be on the child, aware of current and future needs, to fine tune the journey, coaching and mentoring as needed to encourage and guide.

 

I hope you will find the time to comment on this blog post. To do so, click on ‘Leave a comment’ at the top of this blog, just below the title. I will post a further blog, reporting on the second half of the Community Engagement #SLTChat debate in the next few days.

 

Palmyra, Art Making Animals, #ARTCONNECTS, the Jarrow Marchers, and Ethics

Courtesy of Catch Up T.V. I watched the first episode of Civilisations: Second Moment of Creation on BBC2 this weekend. The historian, Simon Schama is a magician. He speaks with an authority and allure that instantly places you under a spell, drawing you in. Schama announces the series by looking at the formative role art and the creative imagination have played in the forging of humanity itself. I have now watched the first five minutes of that episode several times. The gravity of the opening moments will not escape you. We endeavour to protect the treasures of civilisations so that we pass on their revelation to the future, Schama says. But then, every so often, something comes along to shake them from our grip. Schama gives us the example of the ancient city of Palmyra, in present day Syria – 130 miles northeast of Damascus, known by Syrians as the ‘Bride of the Desert’. Palmyra, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a place of significant interest because it is a place where the cultures of Greeks, Romans, Arabs and Jews mixed and merged. Last year, the ISIS militant group took over Palmyra and razed some of the ancient ruins to the ground. The militants captured the site’s Chief Curator Khaled al-Asaad and publicly beheaded him when he refused to say where some of the site’s treasures had been taken for safe-keeping. Schama muses on the fact that we might talk about the value of saving and cherishing treasures passed on as civilisation but then, How many of us would give up our life for it? Schama offers help in defining civilisation by helping us recognise its counterpart.

When its opposite shows up in all its brutality and cruelty and intolerance and lust for destruction we know what civilisation is. We know it from the shock of its imminent loss as a mutilation on the body of our humanity.

And then, for me, the nub, with Schama declaring, “We are the art making animal”. It defines our place in the world. Wow! The meaning behind the programme’s subtitle is revealed. ‘The Second Moment of Creation.’ The dawning of human creativity.

A couple of weeks ago it was Rae Snape (Twitter: @RaeSnape ) who drew my attention to a national 3 day festival to showcase Creative Schools, Work and Lives. A collaboration with venues and organisations across Kings Cross, London; The #ARTCONNECTS Festival of Creativity organised by @ST3AMC0 and @People4Art .

You know those flyers that edufirms weigh down the friendly school postie’s sack with? The ones that announce event dates and then suggest audience make up? Often they begin (always in perceived hierarchical order) with headteacher, deputy headteacher, senior leadership team, and finish somewhere deeper on the page with ‘the boiler service engineer’. Well, the #ARTCONNECTS organisers stated that the event was for ‘Parents and other Carers like Artists, Parents, Teachers, Techs, Creatives, Students and Business People’. I know that because I have just looked it up. I rather pathetically replied to Rae that because I live 250 miles north of London I would not be attending. I should have done. I wish I had. I would have been better persuaded if I had registered the target audience at the time.

I followed the event with interest, courtesy of Twitter. It is well worth spending a bit of time trawling through the #ARTCONNECTS thread. At the event, Geoff Barton (General Secretary ASCL) gave an excellent and heartfelt talk on the ‘arts as a social mobility birthright’.

Geoff highlights the fact that the squeeze on creative art subjects in state schools is not happening in independent schools. It is not, because it is seen as an entitlement, what parents are paying for. Geoff suggests that we change tack in our line of debate. This is not about funding, it is about values and social mobility. What is more, “Through art, humans become more human.” It is, therefore, “a birthright”. This really does take us back to Simon Schama’s viewpoint does it not? We are the art making animal. It defines our place in the world. The Second Moment of Creation was the dawn of human creativity. This is an ethical issue. It is.

If you do not follow George Gilchrist’s (Twitter @Gilchrist George ) blog I suggest you do. Always challenging, insightful and interesting. This week, George posted this, Speaking of ethics . George argues that, often, those issues we see as located around values do in fact raise questions around ethical working. George says that if we do not take the time to discuss and consider such issues, it is so easy for us to take the path of least resistance, taking action or making decisions that best meet the needs of the system rather than the learners and families we work with every day. And then, the big question, we all recognise:

Is it ethical to spend time narrowing the curriculum and spending more time preparing young learners for tests, just because they are high-stakes for us? Is it right that we coach learners in how to pass exams, rather than continuing to educate them holistically?

Twenty plus years on from that TED Talk, Do schools kill creativity , Ken Robinson spoke at an event held in Minneapolis on 22nd February. A huge misconception amongst adults, according to Robinson, is that kids don’t like to learn. On the contrary, “my conviction is that kids love to learn. That’s not the problem,” he shared. Rather, “it’s the construct of school” that beats a love to learn out of students, he says.

We have to reframe the abilities of our children. We have deep natural talents, but we have to discover them and cultivate them. If you have a narrow view of ability, you generate an enormous amount of inability.

Geoff is right, of course it is a question of values. Although, George has me thinking that it is more than that. It is an ethical issue. Who are we to deny our young ones their birthright? I agree with Geoff, through art, humans become more human. For, after all, as Simon Schama says, we are the art making animal. The dawning of human creativity, Schama contends, equates to the Second Moment of Creation. If we heed Ken Robinson’s warnings on adopting a narrow view of ability, condemning those simultaneously branded as unable, whilst observing a creeping narrowing of the curriculum, we are working unethically.

It is worth hearing again Simon Schama’s reflection on civilisation:

When its opposite shows up in all its brutality and cruelty and intolerance and lust for destruction we know what civilisation is. We know it from the shock of its imminent loss as a mutilation on the body of our humanity.

I do not wish to disrespect Khaled al-Asaad and his family by comparing his making of the ultimate sacrifice in protecting the treasures he saw as his duty to pass on to the next generation to the, let us call it the identified birthright issue, in our schools, but it is worth thinking on. It is an ethical issue.

Something else to contemplate… we are getting very clever, it seems, at creating automatons, and new ground is being broken in the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). Does this mean that non-humans, created by humans, are shifting on the spectrum, closer to where humans currently sit? Another question… If we continue to take the path of less resistance, not challenging ‘the system’ as it currently stands and works, stripping children of their creativity in our schools, are we humans actually shifting towards those non-humans on the spectrum; a convergence? Now that is an ethical issue!

I would like to finish on a brighter, more promising note. Those of you who are kind enough to find the time to read my blogs know that my passion is community capacity building and working for more authentic, socially engaged, family-school-community partnerships. Ken Robinson challenged the idea that many of our young ones are apathetic and do not like to learn. Rather, he says, school systems are failing too many children. I would like to add to that by dispelling the myth that families in those communities that I have been lucky enough to work are apathetic where the Arts is concerned. On two occasions, I have had the absolute pleasure to be one of a group of 180 plus children and adults (parents/carers + staff) from two of the schools I have led in, journeying to London to take advantage of what the Big City has to offer. On both occasions (two different school communities) we spent a full day in the Tate Britain exploring the work of William Turner. The evening we spent at The Lyceum, watching The Lion King. The following day, the Victoria and Albert Museum. We worked with the children and parents prior to the visit, in school, and post-visit. Don’t tell me there isn’t an appetite for the Arts in communities such as those I have served. I will never forget the sight of one dad sitting two seats down from me in the Lyceum, perched on the edge of his seat, transfixed, his face a picture of sheer enjoyment. I cannot say how many times he thanked me after the show, on behalf of his son, and himself, when it was for me to thank him.

Wreck-of-a-Transpo_2746157b
The Wreck of a Transport Ship (1810) by JMW Turner

I have spoken in previous blogs of schools encouraging parents/carers to be activists, change agents. Geoff is right to say that we cannot stand by and allow the squeeze on arts to go unchallenged. I say we enlist our parents and community and have them stand with us to demand the birthright of our young ones.

Returning to the matter of delegate menus. Reading that list of suggested attendees for #ARTCONNECTS awakens in me memories such as that described above. That is why I should have listened to Rae and got myself down there. After all, if the Jarrow Marchers can walk to London, I could have caught the train or driven.

Twelve Guinea Pigs in a Fishbowl, a mid-Vacation Break, and Wenger (not Arsène)

I have just written an article (yet to be published) telling of and then expanding on an example of a moment in my career when all that I believe in as a person, an educator and a school leader broke the surface. I have another one. I want to share it.

This blog post might have sat in the holding area if it was not for a Twitter exchange I had this morning that set me thinking. One of the responses I gave was motivated by something somebody said to me last night, used in a different context. A modification of what was said to me but used in the same vein, ‘A river will flow between two banks. Take one away and you have a problem. School and families must pull together, I agree.’ Which takes me back to the opening paragraph. And so…

As a school, we had engaged with the research and work of Dr Russ Quaglia and the Quaglia Institute in the U.S.; more here and here. We had worked with Russ’s Aspirations Profile and explored School Voice (Student, Teacher, Parent) over a good period of time. The Quaglia Institute’s Chief Academic Officer, Dr Michael Corso, let it slip that he was journeying to Scotland for a family holiday. Now, we are based in the north east of England, so Scotland ain’t too far off. And yes, I do know that Scotland is a sizeable lump and, indeed, boasts a physiognomy that is made up of many sizeable skyward pointing lumps that require circumnavigation. So, as the crow flies, we are not that far away. Mickey was easily persuaded to hop on the train and lead a day of professional development for us Sassenachs.

I will not go into the content of the training. Accept that it was exceptionally good stuff, provoking thinking and good conversation. Skip forward to the morning break. Mickey says to me, “Can we borrow some of those children out on the field?” It was our field, the school field. We had laid down one of our Baker day chips but we had quite a lot going on that was being run by external providers. “Well, of course, Mickey, whatever you want!” I did ask why, and I did phone home to gain consent for each of the 12 guinea pigs. Am I allowed to say that? I guess I just did!

Fast forward to the beginning of the afternoon session. The 12 were sat in a circle, Mickey alongside. The 13 were encircled by us (whole staff – 40ish). We, in turn, were corralled by a mixture of parents/carers/grandparents who had asked if they could attend, when called earlier. Mickey had asked if it was alright for him to conduct a focus group interview, “in a fishbowl”. It might prove uncomfortable, he warned. All those surveys we had diligently served and chased in were to be tested, in the moment, in the raw, with an audience. I think it is fair to say that we all sat spellbound as Mickey, with consummate skill, drew narrative from our Likert-styley surveys, through the children. He had done his homework. And he had done his homework! Words from the morning session flooded back. ‘Taking surveys is the first step.’ ‘It is the next steps that really matter.’ For a full ninety minutes, Mickey teased and provoked. The young ones loved it. They gave voice. We were enthralled, regardless. The other adults in the room listened attentively, and then chipped in. The conversation had is one that will stay with me always. Even more so, the fact it happened in the way it did. There existed a magical connectedness that was truly special. Far from being an uncomfortable experience, I think we found it decidedly liberating. I learned so very much that day. Experiences like that have informed my outlook and my belief in the importance of connected communities, transparency, and good, honest, wholehearted conversations.  

The event also flooded back as I watched Rabbi Dara Frimmer pointing out that what we care about is deeply connected to who we are, our life experiences, our pain and disappointment as well as our greatest joy. Rabbi Frimmer says that if we can just remember to get at those sorts of stories and share those of our own we are far more likely to create a network of committed people who are ready to bring about social change. For, “Surveys are not stories.” Rabbi Frimmer suggests that surveys will never be able to reproduce the feelings and the emotions and the sense of connection that people receive when you sit together and listen to people telling their stories. “Surveys are not stories.” Stories remind us that what we think are deeply personal, private issues are in fact shared public concerns. Imagine, Rabbi Frimmer says, if we began to work on any of these shared issues together. I share more on this here.

Etienne Wenger’s brilliant work on Communities of Practice identifies three dimensions that he says are the source of coherence of a community of practice: mutual engagement; a joint enterprise; and a shared repertoire. Might thinking on a more authentic home-school-community partnership benefit from the drawing of parallels with Wenger’s conceptualisation? For, in such a model, group members are engaged in actions which meanings they negotiate with one another in actively participating. Wenger’s second characteristic of practice as a source of community coherence is the negotiation of a joint enterprise:

It is defined by the participants in the very process of pursuing it. It is their negotiated response to their situation and thus belongs to them in a profound sense, in spite of all the forces and influences that are beyond their control.
(Wenger, 1998, p. 77)

If we accept that every school community is unique then it follows that community capacity building calls for active negotiation of family-school-community partnership in your context. I believe that school communities aspiring to be full potential communities of practice simply must invite families and community into the room. We had our eyes opened by Mickey when he took a mid-vacation break to share his light with us.

It is testament to Mickey’s skill and expertise that so many teachers expressed the view to me at the end of the day that it was the best professional learning day they had ever experienced. Most notable, was the number of young teachers who felt moved to say so. It thrills me to think that they carry that learning forward with them.  

Dr. Michael Corso now serves as Department Chair in Theology at the Catholic Memorial College, Boston, Massachusetts; a post he took up back in September 2016. Dr. Michael (Mickey) Corso’s transition from the frying pan (Quaglia Institute) to the fire (high school teacher) was the inspiration for this blog series, “Walking the Talk: The School Voice Chronicles.” Italics, Dr. Russ Quaglia’s, in his foreword. Mickey begins:

Having flown to dozens of schools and entered hundreds of classrooms, I spent last week driving to just one school—where I will be a department chair—and organizing just one classroom—the one I will share with my four classes of students. Last week for the first time in a long time I attended a faculty orientation at which I was not the keynote speaker. I participated in professional development and was not among those providing a workshop. I did not get to leave when the administration turned to handing out schedules, class rosters, and the binder full of policy-rich, procedure-laden practicalities. I finally had to sit through a discussion about cell phone policy. This week I will greet my students for the first time. And, although my friends say I am crazy, I am looking forward to all of it!

 

I urge you to take a look at Mickey’s blog, recording, with honesty and integrity, his return to the classroom; “a rookie teacher in his fifties”. In it, Mickey embraces vulnerability and peels back the layers… Just as he encouraged us to do on the day described above.

Thank you, my friend!

Walking the Talk blog series…

Walking the Talk: T Minus One Week

Walking the Talk: Like Riding a Bike… Almost!

Walking the Talk: One for Three

Walking the Talk: Under the Hood

Walking the Talk: Square Peg, Round Hole

Walking the Talk: The Effort to Relate

Walking the Talk: Investing in Social Capital

Walking the Talk: Enthusiasm Spasm

Walking the Talk: Examining Heads

Walking the Talk: Halfway Pay Off

REFERENCE

Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity, Cambridge: CUP.

Hope + Aspirations: Pope Francis, drinking gin and SOLIDARITY

The future is made of yous, it is made of encounters, because life flows through our relations with others. Life is not merely time passing by, life is about interactions.

His Holiness, Pope Francis

I had an encounter this morning that will sound familiar to those of you who have ever taught young people. On our way home, my wife and I called in a local supermarket. As we approached the checkout I noticed ‘A’ straight away; a former pupil at one of my previous schools. When our turn came, he looked up, smiled broadly and said, “It is you, isn’t it? Mr Feasey?” For those colleagues who work in secondary or tertiary education the leap is not so great, I imagine, but seeing the young man (or woman) version of the boy (or girl) you remember as primary school age is always quite something, often stunning. I extended my hand, ‘A’ shook it firmly, and then (as he whipped several items across the scanner) told Gill and I of his plan. He was working when he could to earn money as he attended college. I leapt in with, “So you will be going to university then?” ‘A’ put me right. He is working hard to get good grades and hopes to secure an apprenticeship with a firm in the sector he is interested in. That, so that he does not have to saddle himself with a big debt. I walked out of the shop smiling inwardly, and outwardly, no doubt. I earnestly hope that ‘A’ achieves all of his goals, and more.

Not so long ago I had the privilege of being a guest speaker on a webinar led by Dr Russ Quaglia. Russ (Twitter: @DrRussQ) has spent decades researching Student Voice and Aspirations with his team at the Quaglia Institute in the U.S. – working with and supporting schools in the U.S. and nationally.

Russ is probably the most passionate, committed and articulate academic/practitioner I have ever come across. His work on School Voice (Student/Teacher/Principal/Parent) is grounded in deep and extensive research, over a considerable period of time. What draws me to Russ’s work is that its core intention is to offer agency, hope and purpose. Russ says that school voice isn’t just about asking and listening – it is also about what happens next. The Quaglia Institute define Aspirations as the ability to dream and set goals for the future while being inspired in the present to reach those dreams. Aspirations are both “then” and “now.” They involve both dreaming of the future, and doing in the present. They are made up of a vision of where we want to get and, at a minimum, a willingness to do what is necessary to get there.

I would place ‘A’ squarely in the top-right quadrant. I cannot take credit for that, other than knowing that, as a team, we offered ‘A’ the very best we could at our school. I cannot remember his attainment levels but I am confident that he would have done well. I remember ‘A’ exemplifying all that we valued and celebrated in our school. I remember ‘A’’s parents as supportive of school, of their son, and wanting the very best for him. I do not know how secondary school went for ‘A’ but I would hazard a guess that ‘A’ has largely driven himself to where he sits right now, in the top right quadrant of the Aspirations Profile. That said, I have no doubt that certain stand out individuals would have given ‘A’ a nudge in the right direction from time to time. We all need that.

Did you know that His Holiness Pope Francis has given a TEDTalk? He has. In 2017, Pope Francis’ talk was transmitted live from the Vatican to an audience attending a TEDTalk event named ‘The Future You’. His Holiness stressed that he aimed to give out the message “the only future worth building includes everyone”. He said that he liked the event title because:

While looking at tomorrow, it invites us to open a dialogue today, to look at a future through a “you”. The future is made of yous, it is made of encounters, because life flows through our relations with others. Life is not merely time passing by, life is about interactions.

He reminds us that we all need each other, none of us is an island, separated from the other, and “we can only build the future by standing together, including everyone”.

Pope Francis talks of Science and how it points to an understanding of reality, as a place where every element connects and interacts with everything else. “How wonderful would it be, while we discover faraway planets, to rediscover the needs of the brothers and sisters orbiting around us.” He wonders how good the world would be if solidarity became the default attitude in political, economic and scientific choices, as well as in the relationships among individuals, peoples and countries.

His Holiness offers a stark warning on the issue of power, saying that the more power you hold, the more your actions will have an impact on people, and so, the more responsibility you have to act humbly.

He tells us of a saying in Argentina. Power is like drinking gin on an empty stomach. You feel dizzy, you get drunk, you lose your balance, and you will end up hurting yourself and those around you, if you don’t connect your power with humility and tenderness.

The future of humankind isn’t exclusively in the hands of politicians, of great leaders, of big companies. Yes, they do hold an enormous responsibility. But the future is, most of all, in the hands of those people who recognise the other as “you” and themselves as part of an “us”. And we all need each other.

How wonderful would it be if in all our school communities solidarity became the default attitude in the relationships among students, their families, school staff, and extended community members? How many of us drink gin on an empty stomach and fail to join the community dots? Not wilfully, I might add, but dizzy perhaps with the ever increasing demands placed upon us. We have the power to do good work here. And God forbid we leave the future of mankind in the hands of our politicians and big business!

‘A’, the fine young man who served us this morning has Hope. He has Aspirations. Returning to Dr Quaglia’s definition:

Aspirations are both “then” and “now.” They involve both dreaming of the future, and doing in the present.

His Holiness, Pope Francis:

We all need each other, none of us is an island, separated from the other, and we can only build the future by standing together, including everyone.

I say it is not naive to believe that all schools, in embracing their communities and fostering solidarity can shape a better and more socially just world. To do so, we must address the needs of all those orbiting around our communities by listening to their stories and addressing traditional lines of power. Together, we can multiply Hope and drive and guide those young ones we are all there for; their Aspirations “then” and “now”.

Whether or not ‘A’ needed a safety net, I know not. You will have a store of similar encounters and stories of your own. I do wonder how many more young people would have hit that top right quadrant if, typically,  solidarity marked family-school-community partnerships.

I offer a coaching service to schools and school leaders on community capacity building. The approach I advocate is one based on relational leadership and lessons drawn from the field of community organising. I begin by listening and seeking to understand both school narrative and community narrative. We then work on bringing the two together by designing and embedding a relationship-centred and dialogical problem-solving approach that works for your school community. This process is bonded by the connections between people that are based on values of respect, trust, mutuality, reciprocity and dignity, and which result in conviviality, compassion and cooperation. Collective efficacy and action grow in strength as individuals form groups, groups identify issues and develop projects that recognise and harness the potential in the overlapping spheres of influence in the lives of our young people: family, school and community. We build school community partnership and generate this sort of activism by bringing people together and adopting a number of tried and tested, and impactful, techniques.

As an outsider I can bring a fresh perspective to issues. This is particularly useful where the issues are highly charged. In the first instance, my relationship with parents and community is established by directly seeking out their stories.


If this is something that interests you and you would like a first conversation then please contact me on 07793055719 or email me at simonmfeasey@gmail.com

School Community Jigsaws (Balthasar, Melchior and Gaspar)

I usually give significant time and thought to any one blog post, returning to texts and other media as I travel. But today I feel moved to tread the road less travelled by, just as Balthasar, Melchior and Gaspar did a couple of thousand years ago.

This morning I attended the early mass, as usual, at our local church. The mass was said in celebration of the Epiphany (the 12th day of Christmas – 6th January) – the manifestation of Christ to the Gentiles as represented by the Magi (the 3 wise men).

Monsignor began his sermon by talking of a visit he made to the home of a member of the parish, this week. Monsignor was drawn to a picture on the wall, one that he recognised as a Canoletti; a view of Venice. He said that he moved across to it, sensing there was something odd about it. Monsignor discovered that it was in fact a jigsaw. Intrigued, he asked about it. The parish member told Monsignor who had completed the jigsaw and then went on to tell him of those people; their stories. Monsignor went on to artfully put this tale to work as he extracted his message from the words of today’s gospel.

The whole episode got me thinking. Truth be told, it doesn’t take much to trigger a line of thought in me. Ask anyone who knows me, I am apt to jump around a bit in conversation.

To the point…

It strikes me that our school communities are jigsaws and every piece has a story to tell. Every piece is key to the bigger picture. Indeed, if all pieces are not accounted for the picture cannot be complete. Accept that and we have to say that no one piece is more important (more powerful?) than any other.

Very truly I tell you, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him.

John 13:16

Equally, every picture represents a moment in time. Time passes… The view may shift, affect an altered hue, or even be transformed. Even so, the law holds, the jigsaw is incomplete without all pieces on the table.

With the three magi in it, the nativity scene at the foot of the altar in our church now looks complete. The jigsaw is complete. We would do well to think on our school jigsaws as being incomplete without accounting for the many pieces representing families and community members. And they all carry their own stories. Much as those who assembled the jigsaw that drew the attention of Monsignor carried stories, as shared with him.

This short thinkpiece relates directly to Friday’s post…

Surveys are not stories and school leaders are not superheroes

Who somebody is or was we can only know by knowing the story of which he himself is the hero.

Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition

Every now and again I enjoy sticking a key word in TED Talks search facility, select a talk and open my mind to what the presenter has to say. I guess the experience offers relief from the printed word and allows one to connect with the communicator in a different way. Whatever, listening is the thing, like all good stories.

Recently, I particularly enjoyed two talks where presenters shared their belief in and experience of the empowering aspects of community organising. The presenters were Gerardo Calderón and Rabbi Dara Frimmer. A bit on both.

Gerardo Calderón was born and raised in El Salvador. Calderón suggests that many of the large social movements throughout history are strongly marked with the central leading figures, those who we call heroes. But real social movement comes from the supporting community that stand in the shadow. In his talk, Calderón, drawing from his personal experiences in social movements, discusses what he calls the real heroes of social justice. Calderón begins his talk by sharing his inner and outer response to a question once posed by one of his American friends. He was asked “Which kind of superheroes do you guys in El Salvador have?” Calderón says that he responded with, “We don’t really have superheroes down there.” Then he thought on his own response. He realised that in his country:

… since the very beginning in the family and in schools we are taught that if we want to see change, if we want to foster change, we have to get together with other people, build relationships and act as a family, act as a community. That’s why we don’t really feel the need of superheroes.

Dara Frimmer is a Rabbi at Temple Isaiah in Los Angeles. Rabbi Frimmer was recognized in 2014 as the Human Rights Rabbi of the Year by T’ruah, the national Jewish justice organization. The award recognised her leadership at Isaiah, among interfaith communities in Los Angeles, and nationally, on issues of health, environment, education, hunger and human rights. Rabbi Frimmer’s talk poses two questions: Can true change be made by one person? Or does change occur more efficiently when others are involved? For, one of the biggest challenges we face as agents of social change is that we forget to learn people’s stories as we attempt to enlist them in our cause.

Frimmer points out that what we care about is deeply connected to who we are, our life experiences, our pain and disappointment as well as our greatest joy. She says that if we can just remember to get at those sorts of stories and share those of our own we are far more likely to create a network of committed people who are ready to bring about social change.

For me, the stand out point that Frimmer made is this.

We live in an age of surveys. The problem is that surveys don’t work for social change”

Wrestling with this issue – after being just as prone to issuing surveys as we in schools are – the Temple Isaiah community focused on sharing stories and experiences connected to those stories. For example, the struggle to care for ageing parents as well as children.

Rabbi Frimmer suggests that surveys will never be able to reproduce the feelings and the emotions and the sense of connection that people receive when you sit together and listen to people telling their stories. “Surveys are not stories.” Stories remind us that what we think are deeply personal, private issues are in fact shared public concerns. Imagine, Frimmer says, if we began to work on any of these shared issues together

Sharing stories out loud gives a chance for us to see ourselves differently, as well as other people, and they can even begin to change how we see the world. Frimmer claims that such connections lead to a sense of accountability on both sides. We share stories and we reveal something powerful and important about what we really care about, and if we can remember those stories then we can offer people a real opportunity to act on their self-interest. Further, that this is the accountability you need if you want to turn people out for your events… “I need you to show up for me and you are far more likely to say yes if I know your story.”

Rabbi Frimmer acknowledges that sharing your story may well be an expression of vulnerability and be completely counter-cultural. She says that If you want to use your story for social change you must exercise calculated vulnerability. This challenges you to consider what you are prepared to share about yourself, who you are and what you care about so that the people listening really understand you and your interests. More importantly, that your story will invite others to share a story as well.

In her treatise on the Human Condition, the eminent philosopher Hannah Arendt declared:

Who somebody is or was we can only know by knowing the story of which he himself is the hero.

Arendt posits that stories connect us to actions, not abstractions. Stories connect people directly with one another with a power that generalities (surveys?) miss.

So what? For me, this is what…

Gerardo Calderón’s friend’s question triggered an inner interrogation that led to a response that drew on his own story. He was raised in a place that saw no need to seek superheroes, for family, school and community recognised the power of WE. A community and culture that would recognise the sentiment expressed in the union song…

Step by step the longest march
Can be won can be won
Many stones can form an arch
Singly none singly none
And by union what we will
Can be accomplished still
Drops of water turn a mill
Singly none singly none

Rabbi Frimmer and the Isaiah Temple community in Los Angeles embraced a sharing and weaving together of community members’ stories. These personal experiences, memories, and motivations solidified the group and drove purposeful action and social change. Personal issues became shared public issues. Exercising of calculated vulnerability led to community organising and action. A community, too, that would recognise the sentiment expressed in the union song.

So what? And to the nub of it…

I have an ever growing interest in the question, How can parents and families be involved in schools in ways that benefit both their own empowerment and their children?

Recognising that:

  1. the roles that schools offer parents are often limited and may not tap into many available strengths and resources;
  2. the issue is compounded by the reality that a general tendency of parents to act as individuals rather than as a group will dilute the impact of family involvement in schools.

It is my view that we must create and develop new roles for families, making use of their strengths and expertise. If schools genuinely seek engagement with families and community they must create democratic mechanisms for empowerment and participation. Parents would do well to question the assumption that schools automatically and fully understand the best interests of their families and local community. They may well ask themselves, From what source did school derive our story? A story that informs their (school’s) actions – remembering that surveys are not stories. School leaders are NOT qualified superheroes (Who is?). Parents should expect leaders in the school they have chosen for their child to exercise calculated vulnerability and practise shared story-telling; listening to family and community narrative, in turn. Parents way to this should be eased by the democratic structures erected and protected by school. School leaders need to recognise that democratic family participation in schools may not always be the most efficient way of decision making and planning. However, the benefits for children make it worthwhile. Creating opportunities for respectful and democratic engagement in and around our school communities must surely be one of the most pressing and important issues in the world we inhabit today. We can set off on that road by sharing our stories. But we need to know one another’s first…

I offer a coaching service to schools and school leaders on community capacity building. The approach I advocate is one based on relational leadership and lessons drawn from the field of community organising. I begin by listening and seeking to understand both school narrative and community narrative. We then work on bringing the two together by designing and embedding a relationship-centred and dialogical problem-solving approach that works for your school community. This process is bonded by the connections between people that are based on values of respect, trust, mutuality, reciprocity and dignity, and which result in conviviality, compassion and cooperation. Collective efficacy and action grow in strength as individuals form groups, groups identify issues and develop projects that recognise and harness the potential in the overlapping spheres of influence in the lives of our young people: family, school and community. We build school community partnership and generate this sort of activism by bringing people together and adopting a number of tried and tested, and impactful, techniques.

As an outsider I can bring a fresh perspective to issues. This is particularly useful where the issues are highly charged. In the first instance, my relationship with parents and community is established by directly seeking out their stories.


If this is something that interests you and you would like a first conversation then please contact me on 07793055719 or email me at simonmfeasey@gmail.com

Community Capacity Building: an organic ecological approach, no hothousing

For children and adolescents, the most critical ecological transitions and intersecting connections are the interactions between home, school, and peer groups.
Soo Hong, 2011 p. 24

In earlier blogs I have explored the process-oriented field of community organising in seeking clearer strategies for how we can build meaningful relationships between families and schools. Typically, standard parent involvement approaches avoid issues of power and consign parents to support the status quo. In contrast, community organising approaches to school reform in the US, where there is a long-standing tradition of community organising, explicitly focus on power, intentionally building parent power. In my work with schools, I advocate the joining together of school narrative and community narrative, encouraging new points of connection through important conversations. Participants in these conversations learn that relationships can be stymied by a lack of understanding, distrust, or individual fears and anxieties. And so, by adopting and embedding a relationship-centred and dialogical problem-solving approach we root authentic home-school-community partnership in the realities of power, inequality, and a desire for social change.

Consider this…

In March 2017, the Māori tribe of Whanganui in the North Island of New Zealand celebrated the fact that the Whanganui river had been granted the same legal rights as a human being. The tribe has fought for the recognition of their river – the third-largest in New Zealand – as an ancestor for 140 years. Gerrard Albert, the lead negotiator for the Whanganui iwi [tribe] said all Māori tribes regarded themselves as part of the universe, at one with and equal to the mountains, the rivers and the seas. The new law, passed by the New Zealand Parliament in Wellington, now honoured and reflected their worldview.

Just one week later, a court in the northern Indian state of Uttarakhand ordered that the Ganges and its main tributary, the Yamuna, be accorded the status of living human entities. The judges cited the example of the Whanganui river. The decision means that polluting or damaging the rivers will be legally equivalent to harming a person. The court sat in the Himalayan resort town of Nainital. I add the last sentence for no other reason than to mention my father was born there on 14 May, 1929 (Michael’s father served in the Army. My dad spent the first 18 years of his life in the foothills of the Himalayas!).

In the language of the Lakota cosmology, water is mni, an action of living. Emphasising commonality and connectedness rather than separation, instead of being something outside of ourselves that needs to be owned, protected and managed, mni is part of us and we part of it. Lakota rejection of the modernist understanding of water as a resource and insistence that it is a source of life resonates with the Whanganui iwi worldview, as stated by Albert:

We have fought to find an approximation in law so that all others can understand that from our perspective treating the river as a living entity is the correct way to approach it, as in indivisible whole, instead of the traditional model for the last 100 years of treating it from a perspective of ownership and management.

In the interests of harmony throughout this piece, let us adopt an ecological perspective

Warren and Mapp (2011) provide us with a tree metaphor in sharing their understanding of how strong forms of community organising work. They chose the metaphor of a tree because, they say, organising is a phenomenon that grows and develops. That organising efforts take time to mature, and they need to be intentionally cultivated and nurtured. Further, that strong organising efforts have deep roots.

Strong organising has deep roots in tradition. It draws on collective values and extant ties.

For as much as context very much matters, strong organising efforts share fundamental features. Warren and Mapp show these core processes  building relationships and power – in the tree trunk. New relationships are built, and identities expanded. Relationships for long-term change, no silver bullet or top-down reform.

Organising efforts also respond to their environment, to the opportunities and constraints presented by changing political and educational contexts. Organisers must be sensitive to local experiences, needs, and knowledge.

By enacting these processes, organising groups work to transform communities, individuals, and institutions.

Warren and Mapp point out that groups that follow similar organising traditions will grow differently depending on local contexts; the context being the soil, shaped by local social and political history. This, they say, is because organising groups start where people are. They bring people together to share their concerns as well as their wants and dreams.

Soo Hong (2011) does indeed expressly call for an ecological view of parent engagement. In a core of three strands (2011), Soo Hong discusses the work of the developmental psychologist, Urie Bronfenbrenner, and his urging us to understand human development through an ecological orientation that considers the individual as embedded within multiple spheres of influence. He describes the environments within which individuals interact as nested structures.

It is the interconnectedness of individuals within and across sections that shapes an individual’s ability to learn, grow and develop. Soo Hong, rightly, in my view, highlights the fact that the home and school environments are hard to bring together. It is critical, she says, that we understand the interaction between environments.

For children and adolescents, the most critical ecological transitions and intersecting connections are the interactions between home, school, and peer groups.
Soo Hong, 2011 p. 24

 

I always enjoy reading the work of people who are bold enough to just say it. Enter stage left, Andrew Morrish:

The purpose of education is not to effect sudden transformations, but to foster gradual growth… To achieve this, a stand out leader has but one aim in mind: to create a culture that provides these conditions for growth so that the organisation can thrive, gradually and continually. No force-feeding or chemicals. No polytunnels or hothouses. Just good honest muck.

I guess that takes us back round to the idea of adopting an ecological view as we foster relationships, authentic partnerships, and drive community capacity building. An organic one, at that!

Finishing with a Whanganui proverb…

Ko au ko te awa. Ko te awa ko au.
I am the river and the river is me.

This Whanganui proverb describes the relationship between people and the environment, and in this context, the tangata whenua and their ancestral river. The mighty Whanganui river provided oranga (sustenance and wellbeing) to the people who resided on its banks. This was the source of their livelihood, their local ‘supermarket’, their ancestor. Without the river and all its bounty, life would become increasingly difficult. Without the river flowing freely, the land would soon become barren and unworkable. This whakataukī encourages people to be cautious in the way we treat Papatūānuku, the land, sea, and waterways. We are the kaitiaki (guardians) of this world. In our role as kaitiaki, people need to care for and respect our environment and our environment will care and provide for us.

The new status of the Whanganui river means if someone abused or harmed it the law now sees no differentiation between harming the tribe or harming the river because they are one and the same. Thinking on our school communities and the overlapping spheres of influence impacting on the lives of our young people, it may not be possible to match the wonderful achievements enacted in Wellington or Nainital, but we would do well to appoint ourselves as fiercely protective guardians of that particular ecosystem, nested or otherwise. Further, whichever metaphor we chose to represent the system in our school community context, might we take a leaf out of the Lakota cosmology and view community as they view mni. Emphasising commonality and connectedness rather than separation; an action of living.

I work with schools, in a coaching capacity, supporting them in community capacity building. More here

 

REFERENCES

Hong Soo (2011) a core of three strands: A New Approach to Parent Engagement in Schools. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Morrish, A. (2016) The Art of Standing Out: School Transformation, to Greatness and Beyond. London: John Catt: Woodbridge.

Warren, M. R. and Mapp, K. L. (2011) A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organising as a Catalyst for School Reform. Oxford: OUP.

Defining our school communities: curiosity, irreverence, imagination, a sense of humour, along with a bit of a blurred vision about a better world

Community is a desire, continually replenishing itself as people seek voice and connectedness, in all their imperfections.
(Brent, 2004, p 213)

In this blog series to date I have shared my thinking on communal leadership and how school leaders have a key role to play in community capacity building. I have suggested that school leaders adopt the learning on offer from and stance taken by outstanding people in the field of community organising. In this blog I return to the concept of ‘community’ itself, its complexity and why defining it is problematic in itself.

In Blog V, I introduced the work of the late Jeremy Brent. I draw on Brent’s work because I believe that Brent is better qualified than most to offer perspective on community. Brent worked for 30 years as a youth worker on the Southmead Estate, Bristol, starting in 1975. He took a Masters degree in Cultural Studies at Birmingham University in 1992, and went on to complete a PhD at the University of West England, Bristol in 2000. Brent described his research as ‘a search for a way to understand and engage with community, both in general, and specifically in Southmead’.

It is said that Brent refused ‘promotion’ because he wanted to stay on the ground, in the community. Those of us who enjoy or have enjoyed the privilege of serving as school leaders recognise the thrill of being on the ground, in the thick of it. It seems to me that Brent is a classic example of praxis in action. Praxis being a unity of theory and practice, which, in community development, involves theory generated in action.

In advocating a critical approach to community development, Margaret Ledworth (2011) raises concern about the divide between theory and practice that results in ‘actionless thought’ and ‘thoughtless action’. Further, that we have a tendency to emphasise ‘doing’ at the expense of ‘thinking’ (p. 3-4). Some have had a lot to say on this issue in the field of education. The issue of knowledge production is an increasingly charged debate, fuelled by claims posited by ‘knowers’. I am not going there. Brent did the hard miles! And observed:

Ideas can give you the run of the world – action is limited.

What I would say is that I do not think that we think hard enough and deeply enough about what we mean when we speak of, and make statements about, ‘community’ in our schools.

My thinking is tested by Brent in the way he argues that community is best understood in terms of the processes by which it comes about. Community isn’t something that is given or can be relied on. Rather, Brent says, the idea of community is attached to different forms of collective identity that have actually to be created.

Brent offers a fascinating personal reflection on the term ‘community’ in a paper published by Community Development Journal in 2004, entitled ‘The desire for community: illusion, confusion and paradox’. He finds that ‘dictionary-style definitions do not untangle the complexity of community in practice’ (p 214). He argues that, much to the dismay of community utopians, division and unity are part and parcel of community politics. Further, that the times of the strongest community activity have not been times of calm, eschewing definitions describing comfort, such as:

It is like a roof under which we shelter in heavy rain, like a fireplace at which we warm our hands on a frosty day.
(Bauman, 2001, p. 1)

Brent considers arguments about the ‘illusionary nature of community’, based on three sets of ideas:

  1. that illusion does not have a role in the tough world of social reality;
  2. that community is too static to cope with the flows of the world;
  3. that globalisation and its partner, individualisation, are totalising forces that undermine all other forms of social organisation.

As a parent, a citizen, and as a school leader, I sit bolt upright and take notice at this point. And then take some solace as Brent suggests that there is a flip side to the suggestion that community be denied by globalisation, rather that it contests what can equally be criticised as the illusions of individualism. He argues that communities that are dynamic and complex can exist in global conditions.

This anti-definitional approach gives those involved in community activity the possibility, not having to build something that is already defined, but of creating new changes of their own to social life. Perhaps strangely, deconstructing community gives more scope for community action than does definition.

There may be no exact truth to the term, yet, as Wittgenstein points out, ‘[“inexact”] does not mean “unusable”’. Further, that incompletion is a dynamic concept (p. 219).

My interest is piqued. I am drawn back to the world of community organising and the dynamism that pervades messages shared by and the work carried out by Saul Alinsky. Alinsky was an American community organizer and writer. He is generally considered to be the founder of modern community organizing. Alinsky, according to Time Magazine in 1970, was a “prophet of power to the people,” someone who “has possibly antagonised more people… than any other living American.”

Beck and Purcell (2013), in surveying the roots of community organising, highlight Saul Alinsky having described in detail the characteristics of exceptional community organisers. I have pulled five of those characteristics out here:

Curiosity: they are constantly curious about the way things are and how things could be different. They are also the provokers of curiosity in others; “for a people asking ‘why’ are beginning to rebel” (p 71).

Irreverence: they have a profound dissatisfaction with dogma and all repressive ideas and practices.

Imagination: they have the ability both to imagine a better future and to enter into the experience of other people

A sense of humour: they have the ability to recognise and come to terms with the contradictions in the world.

A bit of a blurred vision of a better world: they have the ability to see how small actions and projects link into broader movements for social change.

Is it just me or does the description of such traits, and the liberty on offer if we accept Brent’s suggestion that there is no exactitude around the term ‘community,’ a whet to your appetite?

If so, consider this…

Community is the continually reproduced desire to overcome the adversity of social life, and it is community as desire rather than community as social object which commands engagement.
Brent, 2004, p. 221

Bear in mind, as Tocqueville argued in his observations of civic life in America in the 1830s, organisers bring individuals together in a way that creates a collective capacity not present when individuals act alone. Organisers do not simply aggregate individuals but also create new relationships between them that generate new commitments and resources.

If you have stuck with my line of thinking and its presentation, thank-you. I would be interested to know where that leaves you so far as your thinking on community and community capacity building is concerned.

I repeat, I do not think that we think hard enough and deeply enough about what we mean when we speak of, and make statements about community in our schools.

I do think Jeremy Brent’s authoritative and quite brilliant insights throw up a positively thrilling opportunity that schools and school leaders would do well to embrace.

I confess to watching the Pride of Britain Awards, broadcast this week. I admit to being decidedly dewy eyed watching the piece on Dr Paul Stephenson as he received the Lifetime Achievement Award. Dr Stephenson changed the face of race relations in the UK, taking on institutionalised racism, setting up a sports association with Muhammad Ali. As a young social worker in 1963, civil rights campaigner Stephenson led the successful 60-day boycott of a Bristol bus company that refused to employ black or Asian people, paving the way for Britain’s first race laws. His campaign, inspired by Rosa Parks, directly resulted in the company revoking their colour bar. Eighty years old and suffering from Parkinson’s disease, Dr Stephenson continues to speak out against the effects of discrimination. On taking the stage, Stephenson took the microphone and simply reminded everyone that we owe it to our children and our grandchildren to hand over a society fit for them to live in.

Let us not allow our school communities to be an ‘illusion’ within the globalised world. Rather, let us go with Jeremy Brent’s line ‘Communities that are dynamic and complex can exist in global conditions.’ Let us seek to understand the complexity inherent to our own school community context and exercise curiosity, irreverence, imagination, a sense of humour, along with a bit of a blurred vision about a better world.

All the while, minding this dramatic description of living in modern times by Marshall Berman:

To be modern … is to experience personal and social life as a maelstrom, to find one’s world and oneself in perpetual disintegration and renewal, trouble and anguish, ambiguity and contradiction: to be part of a universe in which all that is solid melts into air.
Berman, 1983, p. 8

Not on our watch, eh?!

REFERENCES

Alinsky, S. D. (1971) Rules for radicals: A pragmatic primer for realistic radicals. New York: Random House.

Beck, D. and Purcell, R (2013) International Community Organising: Taking Power, Making Change. Bristol: Policy Press.

Berman, M. (1983) All that is solid melts into air: The experience of modernity. London: Verso.

Brent, J. (2004) ‘The desire for community: Illusion, confusion and paradox’, Community Development Journal, 39 (3): 213-23.

Brent, J. (2009) Searching for Community: Representation, power and action on an urban estate. Bristol: Policy Press

Ganz, M. (2009) Why David Sometimes Wins: Leadership, Strategy and the Organisation in the California Farm Worker Movement. New York: Oxford University Press.

Ledworth, M. (2011) Community development: A critical approach. Bristol: Policy Press.

Tocqueville, A de. (1969) Democracy in America. New York: Harper Perennial.

Communal Leadership and Community Engagement in our Schools: an essay for #EdBookNZ 2017 edition

This post is one of several that were collated into #EdBookNZ for 2017

I have been invited by #EdBookNZ editor Sonya Van Schaijik (Twitter: @vanschaijik) to contribute to the #EdBookNZ 2017 edition. Sonya is one of the great collaborators and activists in the world of education today. It is my pleasure to submit the following essay. I urge educators from around the globe to connect, collaborate and share learning with our colleagues down under. We have so much to learn from one another. And learning is the work.

I am a primary school headteacher (Principal) in the UK. I have extensive experience in school leadership and a particular interest in family engagement and home-school-community partnership. I am completing a doctorate at Manchester University. My research is on home-school partnership through building relational trust and achieving a more equitable partnership, recognising and addressing the issue of relational power.

Writing in 1887, the German sociologist Ferdinand Tönnies introduced the terms gemeinschaft (community) and gesellschaft (society) in highlighting and examining the shift away from a vision of life as sacred community and toward a more secular society. The transition from a hunting and gathering society to an agricultural society, and then on to an industrial society, he says, have seen community values replaced by contractual ones. In 1992, Sergiovanni argued for a change in our theory of schooling and the extraction of modern day schools from the gesellschaft camp. Not advocating a polar swing, rather, ‘to build gemeinschaft within gesellschaft’. That, in order to revive a sense of common membership; community of kinship, of place, and of mind. A mutual binding to a common goal and shared set of values. I wonder how schools might cultivate relationships with families and local community in order that such an authentic sense of community be invoked?

Blau and Scott (1962) say that communities are socially organised around relationships and the felt interdependencies that nurture them. I have an interest in social interactions across the school community and how the building of relational trust might address issues around relational power. Bryk and Schneider (1996) task leaders with taking actions that reduce parents and care givers’ sense of vulnerability in social interactions that take place in and around school. They see trust very much as a precondition for authentic participation in partnerships. Relational trust is based on perceived respect, competence, integrity, and personal regard for others, and depends on reciprocity. Need we think then on the nature of social interactions taking place in and around the school community and problematize the case for authentic partnership?

We might take a guiding definition for authentic partnership from Susan Auerbach’s (2012) work on conceptualising leadership for authentic partnerships:

Authentic partnerships are respectful alliances among educators, families and community groups that value relationship building, dialogue across difference, and sharing power in pursuit of a common purpose in socially just, democratic schools.

And a guiding definition for relational power as defined by Warren and Mapp (2011):

‘If unilateral power emphasises power “over”, relational power emphasises power “with” others, or building the power to accomplish common aims’.

We inhabit a world in which social divisions are widening not lessening. I believe that community development and commitment to social justice and sustainability requires an understanding of how power works at every level. A few years ago my interest in this dynamic was sparked by Warren and Mapp’s (2011) brilliant work reported in A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organising as a Catalyst for School Reform. The authors locate the problems of public education in the US as grounded in unequal power relations in a socially and economically stratified society. Contextually different to the UK and, indeed, New Zealand, maybe, but what can we learn from descriptions and analysis of ‘active participation’ in works such as Warren and Mapp’s? Saul Alinsky was an American community organizer and writer. He is generally considered to be the founder of modern community organizing. Alinsky was wholly appreciative of local traditions and values. He immersed himself in them when he organised. He thought the only way to communicate with people was within their experience and you could not do that if you did not learn how they thought or talked, or the stories they told.

Modern day schools operate in a high stakes, ‘standards’ driven domain. School leaders are held accountable in a way they never have been before. Yet school leaders also have a direct influence on shaping a school community climate of trust and belonging. What is it that relational leadership has to offer a vision that is based on empowerment of others? One in which leadership lies not in the position given, but in the position taken (Foster, 1986). Should we focus on forms of communal leadership and how that might advance understanding of the position school leaders might take, accepting that school leaders do have a direct influence on shaping a school climate of trust and belonging through “boundary-spanning interactions” with families and local community (Adams et al.,2009).

I believe that relational leadership turns on our understanding of relational powerrelational trust, and our willingness to truly engage with, listen to, and have authentic dialogue with all members of our school community. I would say, too, that in looking to exercise communal leadership we need pay attention to community capacity building.

In exploring community capacity building, we would do well to turn to the field of critical pedagogy (a form of popular education based on people’s life experience) and how that impacts the concept of social justice in our schools, interrogating the insights provided by the likes of Paulo Freire, John Smyth, and Henry Giroux.

The Brazilian educator and philosopher, Paulo Freire, said that ‘Without dialogue there is no communication, and without communication there can be no true education.’ Founding itself upon love, humility, and faith, dialogue becomes a horizontal relationship of which mutual trust between the dialoguers is a logical sequence. False love, false humility, and feeble faith in others cannot create trust. Trust is contingent on the evidence which one party provides the others of his true concrete intentions; it cannot exist if that party’s words do not coincide with their actions.

Community capacity building approaches provide space for those most affected at the ‘grass-roots level’ to identify the constraints they are experiencing. The adoption of ‘co-learning’ and ‘problem-solving… dialogue among equals’ (Eade, 1997) trumps the idea of ‘experts’ administering to those deemed inexpert. Smyth (2011) offers a relationship-centred and dialogical problem-solving approach. The approach hangs on the premise that if change is to be sustainable then what has to be engendered is ownership, and producing this means being patient and flexible in the way in which relationships are created and sustained around authentic trust, respect and notions of mutuality and reciprocity.

The following extract is drawn from a research project carried out in the UK by Harris, Andrew-Power and Goodall, reported in Harris et al. (2009), that explored the relationship between parental engagement and pupil achievement.  

Parental engagement seems to be the worst problem and the best solution. It is the worst problem because it can be difficult to secure, and it is the best solution in terms of raising student performance.

The research findings highlight a number of barriers facing certain parents in supporting their children’s learning. The authors argue that powerful social and economic factors still prevent many parents from fully engaging in schooling. Furthermore, that schools rather than parents are often ‘hard to reach’.

I strongly suggest that we despatch the notion that some parents are ‘hard to reach’ to Room 101 and work on fostering a climate that sits at or towards the end of the spectrum recognised and defined by Warren and Mapp as “power with”. Empowerment involves a form of critical education that encourages people to question their reality: this is the basis of collective action and is built on principles of participatory democracy. What is more…

We are spending a great deal of time, energy, and resources on learning all we can about twenty-first century instruction. We spend millions of professional development dollars searching for those ideas that will bring us success with every student – a success that still eludes us. In all of this, the notion of family engagement, that being empowering the first and most influential teachers of children, seems to somehow get lost. We simply cannot let that to continue to happen.

(Constantino, 2016)

Think on this… Joyce Epstein’s theory of overlapping spheres of influence, determines that students learn more when parents, educators, and others in the community work together to guide and support student learning and development. In this model, three contexts – home, school, and community – overlap with unique and combined influences on children through the interactions of parents, educators, community partners, and students across contexts.

With attention to contexts and social relations, the theory of overlapping spheres of influence changes the narrow focus of “parental involvement” from what an individual parent does to a broader, more realistic representation of how students move, continuously, in and out of several contexts and how the influential people in those contexts may work together to contribute to students’ education and development.

As a school leader, I have worked with Steve Constantino’s logic model.

Critically, Constantino’s work talks of and seeks depth of engagement. It incorporates Epstein’s ‘Six Types of Family Involvement’ and factors in activity across the 3 Spheres. Chapter 1 in Steve’s book Engage Every Family: Five Simple Principles is titled Would Every Family Choose You? What better starting point? If we cannot trust ourselves to check back in with that on a regular basis should we consider emblazoning it big and bold somewhere on the walls of our staff rooms and offices? I say that family and community engagement is the responsibility of all in school, and leaders have a responsibility to provide top quality professional development opportunities around family and community engagement, plus the time to immerse themselves in active participation, alongside parents/carers and community members.

Returning to Auerbach’s definition:

Authentic partnerships are respectful alliances among educators, families and community groups that value relationship building, dialogue across difference, and sharing power in pursuit of a common purpose in socially just, democratic schools.


I am saying that such an aspiration will not be achieved without school leaders exercising relational leadership and communal leadership in order to ignite community capacity building so that the best interests of our young people be met.

I explore all of these ideas and more in greater depth through a series of blogs, here communal leadership and social justice and would greatly appreciate your feedback.

Simon Feasey

Twitter: @smfeasey

Email: simonmfeasey@gmail.com

REFERENCES

Alinsky, S. (1972) Rules for radicals, New York: Vintage Press.

Auerbach, S. (ed.) (2012) School Leadership for Authentic Family and Community Partnerships: Research Perspectives for Transforming Practice, New York: Routledge

Bryk, A. S. and Schneider, B. (2002) Trust in Schools: A core resource for improvement. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.

Bryk, A. S. and Schneider, B (1996) Social trust: A moral resource for school improvement. Chicago: Consortium on Chicago School Research.

Bryk, A. S., Bender Sebring, P., Allensworth, E., Luppescu, S. and Eatson, J. Q. (2010) Organising Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago, Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

Constantino, S. (2016) Engage Every Family: Five Simple Principles, Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Eade, D. (1997) Capacity-Building: An Approach to People-Centred Development. Oxford: Oxfam.

Epstein, J. L. (2011) School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Preparing Educators and Improving Schools (2nd edition), Philadelphia: Westview Press.

Freire, P. (1972) Pedagogy of the oppressed, Harmondsworth: Penguin.

Freire, P. (1994) Pedagogy of Hope, New York: Continuum.

Giroux, H. (2011) On Critical Pedagogy, London: Bloomsbury.

Harris, A., Andrew-Porter, K. and Goodall, J. (2009) Do Parents Know They Matter? Raising achievement through parental engagement, London: Continuum.

Henderson, A. and Mapp, K. (2002), A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family and Community Connections on Student Achievement. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.

Sergiovanni, T.J. (1994) Building Community in Schools, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Sergiovanni, T.J. (2004) The Lifeworld of Leadership: Creating Culture, Community, and Personal Meaning in our Schools, San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Smyth, J. (2011) Critical Pedagogy for Social Justice, London: Continuum.

Smyth, J., Down, B., McInerney, P. (2014) The Socially Just School: Making Space for Youth to Speak Back, New York: Springer

Warren, M. R. and Mapp, K. L. (2011) A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organising as a Catalyst for School Reform, Oxford: OUP.

Schools, Families, and Community: Overlapping Spheres of Influence

Family engagement is not optional. It is not an idea that can sit on a shelf until we determine we have the time or interest.
Dr. Steve Constantino

In this blog series, to date, I have expressed my own strongly held beliefs on schools and families working together for the good of the child/student. I have laid bare the theoretical underpinnings that inform my own core values and attachment to community and social justice. I believe we (school leaders) need to better recognise and embrace the concept of communal leadership and community capacity building.

Currently, there is much in the news and on social media in the UK that suggests too many schools are acting in a way that is alienating them from families and local community. Although, I am aware that far far more are working tirelessly to achieve the polar opposite. The actions of the former does beg the question, Why?

I sincerely hope that if you were to analyse key policy documents in any school in the UK (World?) you would detect the child/student being the central figure. Wordle your school documents and find out? Look up ‘child-centred’ in the Oxford English Dictionary and you will get ‘Giving priority to the interests and needs of children’. Dr. Joyce Epstein’s overlapping spheres of influence model places the child/student plum in the middle. The spheres of influence being: school, family, and community. I will return to Epstein’s model, below.

Dr. Steve Constantino once said to me: If we [schools and educators] truly had it all worked out so that all children were achieving in our schools, without the need to engage with families, then good. But we have not, and will not, so we must. I am paraphrasing there, Steve, but that was the essence of your message.

I make no secret of the fact I am a big fan of Steve’s work and, quite literally, logic, so far as family engagement is concerned. That, because Steve’s work talks of and seeks depth of engagement; something recognised by Peter de Witt in his foreword to Steve’s book Engage Every Family: Five Simple Principles. Tellingly, Chapter 1 in that book is titled Would Every Family Choose You? What better starting point? If we cannot trust ourselves to check back in with that on a regular basis should we consider emblazoning it big and bold somewhere on the walls of our staff rooms and offices?

Steve tells the story of Yagottawana. He uses the story to stress that if one’s desire to make a difficult change (or choice or decision) does not start with the very simple notion that the change (choice, decision) is something we desire, then the likelihood of success isn’t very high.

The story of Yagottawana…

Having numerous issues and stressors in his life, a gentleman made the difficult decision to seek professional counselling. This was a decision that did not come lightly and one that the man debated and rejected many, many times. In the final analysis, though, the man realised that without some assistance, the issues in his life would continue to affect his health and his relationships with the ones he loved. Because of this, he took the large, difficult, and scary step to take help.

Upon arrival to the counsellor’s office, the gentleman was immediately put at ease. He was under no obligation to say anything he didn’t want to say or take any action he didn’t want to take. He was in complete control of the conversation. Almost without knowing it, an hour went by, and the gentleman was asked if he would return the following week. He agreed.

The following week (and several weeks after that) seemed to be a repeat of the first. He talked about all kinds of things, and the individual hours of conversation flew by. After several weeks, he realised he felt a bit better but really couldn’t put his finger on why. At his next appointment with the counsellor he decided to ask.

He walked into the meeting, sat down, and asked the counsellor the question he had been pondering.

“You feel better because you have discovered the secret,” the counsellor said.

“The secret? The secret to what?” The gentleman was a bit irritated at the answer given to him.

“The secret to success,” answered the counsellor. He walked over to his desk and picked up what looked to be a picture frame and handed it to the gentleman.

“Please read this out loud if you will,” said the counsellor. The gentleman looked at the frame. Inside the frame there was no picture and really no sentence or recognisable word to read. He simply saw the following.

YAGOTTAWANNA

When the gentleman read it out loud, at that instant, he realised what the word was and what it meant.

“One’s personal desire to make a difficult change starts with the very simple idea that we WANT to make the change. Without the intrinsic desire, whatever our goal, it most likely will remain elusive. You have decided to make the change. Therefore, you are.” The counsellor sat back waiting for a response.

“Yagottawanna, eh?” said the gentleman. “That simple?”

“That simple.” The counsellor smiled and said not another word. Neither did the gentleman.

The following extract is drawn from a research project carried out in the UK by Harris, Andrew-Power and Goodall, reported in Harris et al. (2009) that explored the relationship between parental engagement and pupil achievement.

Parental engagement seems to be the worst problem and the best solution. It is the worst problem because it can be difficult to secure, and it is the best solution in terms of raising student performance.

The research findings highlight a number of barriers facing certain parents in supporting their children’s learning. The authors argue that powerful social and economic factors still prevent many parents from fully engaging in schooling. Furthermore, that schools rather than parents are often ‘hard to reach’.

Professor Alma Harris and Dr Janet Goodall’s work is grounded in an extensive and impressive body of research in the real world. And so, it is with real authority that they warn of the need for major efforts by schools to understand the local community, and that deep engagement is only possible if the relationship is perceived to be genuinely two-way (Harris et al. 2007).

As stated before in this blog series, I strongly suggest that we despatch the notion that some parents are ‘hard to reach’ to Room 101 and work on fostering a climate that sits at or towards the end of the spectrum recognised and defined by Warren and Mapp as “power with”. After all…

The evidence is convincing; families have a major influence on children’s achievement in school and through life. When schools, families and community groups work together to support learning, children tend to do better in school, stay in school longer, and like school more.
(Henderson and Mapp 2002: 16)

Dr. Joyce Epstein is the architect of the ‘Six Types of Family Involvement’. Again, I return to the idea of depth. Take a look.

This stuff moves us way beyond the Bake Sale. I refer to Beyond the Bake Sale (Henderson, Mapp et al. 2007) still going strong, revised and republished. The foreword to the original in 1986 is quite delicious (sorry!):

Stop! Do not read Beyond the Bake Sale unless you are willing to take a hard look at your beliefs and attitudes about home-school relationships and parent involvement.

Epstein states time and again in her work that ‘School, family, and community partnerships is a better term than parental involvement to recognise that parents, educators, and others in the community share responsibility for students’ learning and development.’

Epstein developed her theory of overlapping spheres of influence, positing that students learn more when parents, educators, and others in the community work together to guide and support student learning and development. In this model, three contexts – home, school, and community – overlap with unique and combined influences on children through the interactions of parents, educators, community partners, and students across contexts. With attention to contexts and social relations, the theory of overlapping spheres of influence changes the narrow focus of “parental involvement” from what an individual parent does to a broader, more realistic representation of how students move, continuously, in and out of several contexts and how the influential people in those contexts may work together to contribute to students’ education and development.

As a school leader, I have worked with Steve Constantino’s logic model. In writing this I returned to Steve’s book for the umpteenth time. All good works reveal new messages on revisiting don’t you find? Already sold on the logic model and the Five Simple Principles, I noticed the naming of chapters and identified the logic in that:

Chapter 1: Would Every Family Choose You?
Chapter 2. A Quick Note About Motivating Teachers
Chapter 3. Understanding Disengagement

Followed by a series of chapters explaining and exploring the five principles (see infographic below)

And then, prior to the epilogue:
Chapter 10. Taking Action and Measuring Success

The logic works, and it worked, for me. Not forgetting (Chapter 2) that it is the responsibility of all in school, and leaders have a responsibility to provide top quality professional development opportunities around family and community engagement, plus the time to immerse themselves in active participation, alongside parents/carers and community members.

Those of you who have given your valuable time to work through this series of blogs will recognise my belief in empowerment. Steve acknowledges Epstein’s work in relating it to his Principle #4 Engage Every Family in Decision Making. Epstein says of Decision Making – Type 5:

Parents’ voices must be heard when it comes to decision making at the school. This enables families to participate in decisions about the school’s programs and activities that will impact their own and other children’s educational experiences. All parents must be given opportunities to offer ideas and suggestions on ways to improve their schools. Having families as true stakeholders in the school creates feelings of ownership of the school’s programs and activities.
National Network of Partnership Schools

I offer no apologies for laying down chunks of referenced text in this blog, although I do appreciate they amount to much. I do thank Steve and those who have dedicated themselves to enabling schools to embrace the power inherent to a recognition of the overlapping spheres, namely: School, Family, and Community – with the child/student front and centre.

Final word, from Dr. Constantino…

We are spending a great deal of time, energy, and resources on learning all we can about twenty-first century instruction. We spend millions of professional development dollars searching for those ideas that will bring us success with every student – a success that still eludes us. In all of this, the notion of family engagement, that being empowering the first and most influential teachers of children, seems to somehow get lost. We simply cannot let that to continue to happen.

Hear hear!

REFERENCES
Constantino, S. (2016) Engage Every Family: Five Simple Principles, Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.

Epstein, J. L. (2011) School, Family, and Community Partnerships: Preparing Educators and Improving Schools (2nd edition), Philadelphia: Westview Press.

Harris, A. and Goodall, J. (2007) Engaging Parents in Raising Achievement: Do Parents Know They Matter? Warwick: University of Warwick.

Harris, A., Andrew-Power, K. and Goodall, J. (2009) Do Parents Know They Matter? Raising achievement through parental engagement, London: Continuum.

Henderson, A. and Mapp, K. (2002) A New Wave of Evidence: The Impact of School, Family and Community Connections on Student Achievement000, Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.

Henderson, A.T., Mapp, K. L., Johnson, V.R. and Davies, D. (2007) Beyond the Bake Sale: The Essential Guide to Family/School Partnerships, New York: The New Press.